Revolution in South Asia

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Archive for July 18th, 2009

Bimal: Interview with “One of the Most Wanted Persons” in India

Posted by n3wday on July 18, 2009

maoist forces in IndiaThis is an interview with Bimal, a leader and Politburo member of the Communist Party of India (Maoist). It was conducted with  correspondents  The Times of India, April 27, 2009 and then published by People’s Truth.

WE WANT A SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT PATH AND INCLUSIVE GROWTH TRAJECTORY THAT WON’T DIVEST THE POOR FROM THE FRUITS OF THEIR LABOR

You are one of the most wanted persons of the country. Even Left Front Chairman Biman Bose announced months ago that you have entered Bangal from Jharkhand. What made you come here?

(Smiles) I am not new to this terrain.

I first came to Bengal from Dandakaranya in 1995.. I have been to the villages in Lalgarh in West Midnapore in 1998. The Bengal-Jharkhand-Orissa (BJO) border zone, as well as North Bengal, has been our priority. North Bengal — which would give us access to the North-East, Bangladesh and Bhutan. But we chose the BJO because that is part of a contiguous forest cover spread over Andhra Pradesh, Chhattisgarh, Orissa, Bengal and Bihar.

I joined politics in my student days in Karimnagar College, North Telengans, from where I did my graduation in mathematics. Kondapelli Sitaramaiah was our political guru. We took military training from the LTTE in 1981.

Today our party has an uninterrupted presence in this 800-km corridor up to Bangriposi in Orissa, except of short patch of 30 km.

West Bengal has been a traditional Left bastion for decades. What made you concentrate on this state?

Bankura, Purulia and West Midnapore are three of the most backward districts of the state.

Our organizers have been working in these areas since long. We have some organizers in Mayurbhanj and East Singhbhum as well. What I find unique in Bengal is the hegemony of political parties.

True, there are no big landlords here as in Andhra Pradesh. But here political leaders have turned oppressors. Earlier, it was the Congress, and now it is the Communist Party (Marxist) (CPM). Power-hungry CPM leaders – some of them even coming from Dalit or poverty-stricken families – are now disowning their roots. They have become lackeys of the state machinery and are controlling everything from business to social institutions. They are social fascists.

[Note: the CPM is a government party in West Bengal, and despite its communist name has been active in violently repressing both the people and revolutionary activity there. “Social-fascist” means that they are socialist in name, but fascist in reality. The CPM is one of the main oppressive forces here, and therefore a major target of the revolutionary efforts.]

Asim Mondal, who was killed in Bhulabheda, was a CPM leader-cum-timber trader. He used to decide prices of kendu leaf and was also raising a force against us. It’s the same with others. The villages and villagers’ lives are under their control. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in India Background, India News | Leave a Comment »

Revolution in India: Lalgarh’s Example Spreading?

Posted by n3wday on July 18, 2009

Maoists_PLGA_red_flag_CPI_Maoist_India

This article was published in the Hindustan Times, thanks to Ka Frank for pointing it out.

Koraput headed the Lalgarh way: Tribals look to Maoists for ‘liberation’

Soumyajit Pattnaik

Koraput, June 22, 2009

It’s a similar story, headed for a similar ending. Koraput, an under-developed Orissa district, has been cut off from the world for the last five days and looks in danger of becoming another area “liberated” by Maoists.

Like Lalgarh in West Bengal, before it was won back.

Dispossessed tribals on one side and alleged grabbers on the other are in the middle of a violent battle for land waging in Koraput, which is 560 km from Bhubaneshwar. And no prizes for guessing who is winning.

The administration exists on ground but only just. It has no clue as to how much land was lost by tribals and is able to only hazard a guess about how much has been reclaimed by them through peaceful or not-so-peaceful means.

The tribals don’t bring their complaints to the local administration any more. They go straight to organisations backed by the Maoists. In fact, the tribals are not complaining at all. They simply grab back what was grabbed from them.

“They come and hoist a red flag in our agricultural land, signaling the end of our possession over it. I owned 11 acres of land. Now, I’m hiding in the houses of my relatives,” said Madhusudan Pondu, 72, of Balipeta village. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in India News | Leave a Comment »